Voices

Mavericks on the Street
Communications Team


This fall, we asked many Mavericks in our community about what it has been like for them during this pandemic. As 2020 comes to a close, we wanted to share a sneak peek of their answers. Be on the lookout for the next issue of Nueva Magazine, where we’ll share even more of our Mavericks on the Street responses!

What advice would you give to your old self at the beginning of quarantine?

  • “Please view this as the beginning of something new. Seize learning opportunities. Lean into this challenging time. Also, let go of what you perceive as the normal standard. Life is a wonderful experience, and it is only my perception that makes the difference a negative one.” – Chris Braun, shop manager and I-Lab engineer
  • “Try not to get stressed as much. I used to get stressed about not seeing my friends; now I try to be as calm as I can.” – Mia T., fourth-grade
  • “Spend some more time outdoors and away from the computer. Although our work and social lives are now inevitably tied to our devices, it's good to just go outside every day. Once a day, take at least a few minutes to just do nothing at all.” – Jonathon T. '22

Is there a special project you have been working on during quarantine? A new hobby you have discovered?

  • “I discovered I like making coffee, especially cold brew.” – Kaila E. '24
  • “While I regularly set off the fire alarm in my house, I have enjoyed cooking so much during quarantine! My favorite recipes are a blend of South American and Pakistani cuisine and taste like home.” – Sasha, second-grade lead teacher
  • “I have really gotten into cooking and have been cooking breakfast and lunch for my whole family. Cooking to me is really special because I love it and my dad taught me to cook.” – Miriam H., sixth-grader

How has your personal style changed during quarantine?

  • “My clothing style has definitely headed to more t-shirt and shorts attire.” – Anna K. '24
  • “I've grown out my hair on purpose.” – Elbert P., third-grader
  • “I often don't wear shorts that match my shirt.” – Anton P., seventh-grade

Describe this period of your life in one word.

  • “Different.” – Lee Fertig, head of school
  • “Vulnerable.” – Amber Carpenter, upper school English teacher
  • “Adjusting.” – Cliff Burke, fifth-grade writing and humanities teacher


Read More

Mavericks on the Street

This fall, we asked many Mavericks in our community about what it has been like for them during this pandemic. As 2020 comes to a close, we wanted to share a sneak peek of their answers. Be on the lookout for the next issue of Nueva Magazine, where we’ll share even more of our Mavericks on the Street responses!

A Moment to Reflect on My Filipino Heritage

Following his recent reelection to the California state legislature, Assemblymember Rob Bonta commemorated Filipino American History Month at an event organized by Nueva’s Filipino Club. Bonta shared how his identity as a Filipino American influenced his political career, which has been devoted to promoting social justice, inclusion, equity, and opportunity. As I listened to Assemblymember Bonta share his perspective on what it means to be Filipino, I reflected on my own Filipino identity.

The Land We Learn On

November is Native American Heritage Month, a fact that often gets overlooked in the midst of parent-teacher conferences and Thanksgiving holiday planning. This year at Nueva, we wanted to focus more intently on Native American history and, specifically, our relationship to the land that Nueva rests upon and our responsibility as an institution to bear witness to the history of this soil.

On Democracy and Democratic Values

Upper school history teacher Tom Dorrance gave this speech to the upper school student and faculty community on October 6, 2020, to kick off the start of upper school election programming. Tom shared, "There were two main goals for this speech. First, to suggest and sketch out some common ground and common values with the recognition that common ground is essential for debate. Second, to talk about the urgency of this moment but striking a different note than the apocalyptic, sky-is-falling language, and why this urgency exists."

Reconnecting with My Heritage

My connection with my Latino heritage is very meaningful to me; however, this connection was one that I had to work to find. My grandparents did not always involve my parents in aspects of our Latino culture because it was often looked down upon in schools and in the world. With my parents being left out of many traditions, it made it harder for them to share this aspect of our identity with my sister and me. Part of this disconnect feels inevitable, as being third or fourth generation Americans means we associate more with our American history.

Diane Rosenberg Head of School

We are in the midst of what feels like a collective consciousness stirring. Our hope comes from you, Class of 2020—for who you are, the actions you will take, and the light you will bring into the world. Today is the day to focus on who you are.