Voices

A Day in the Life of a Nueva Student: Remote Learning Edition
Mitzi Mock, Digital Storyteller

 

Two student standing in front of a beach background with a "Day in the life" header

 

Wondering what a day in remote learning looks like from a student’s perspective? Ninth-grader Sam B. and eighth-grader Tatiola S. are ready to give you an inside look! From cooking in chemistry to sharing dance moves over Zoom, our students show you that our “learn by doing, learn by caring” culture can be found in our classes, no matter how or where they happen.

 

Follow a day in the life of middle school student Tatiola S. '25.

 

Follow a day in the life of upper school student Sam B. '24.

 



Read More

The Land We Learn On

November is Native American Heritage Month, a fact that often gets overlooked in the midst of parent-teacher conferences and Thanksgiving holiday planning. This year at Nueva, we wanted to focus more intently on Native American history and, specifically, our relationship to the land that Nueva rests upon and our responsibility as an institution to bear witness to the history of this soil.

On Democracy and Democratic Values

Upper school history teacher Tom Dorrance gave this speech to the upper school student and faculty community on October 6, 2020, to kick off the start of upper school election programming. Tom shared, "There were two main goals for this speech. First, to suggest and sketch out some common ground and common values with the recognition that common ground is essential for debate. Second, to talk about the urgency of this moment but striking a different note than the apocalyptic, sky-is-falling language, and why this urgency exists."

Reconnecting with My Heritage

My connection with my Latino heritage is very meaningful to me; however, this connection was one that I had to work to find. My grandparents did not always involve my parents in aspects of our Latino culture because it was often looked down upon in schools and in the world. With my parents being left out of many traditions, it made it harder for them to share this aspect of our identity with my sister and me. Part of this disconnect feels inevitable, as being third or fourth generation Americans means we associate more with our American history.

Diane Rosenberg Head of School

We are in the midst of what feels like a collective consciousness stirring. Our hope comes from you, Class of 2020—for who you are, the actions you will take, and the light you will bring into the world. Today is the day to focus on who you are.

Every. Single. Day.

How do those in power positions who have not wrestled with and understand the African American plight feel the need, have the desire, or become motivated to make changes for justice’s sake.