Middle School News

Middle School Students Make Big Impact on Community Service Learning Day
Rachel Freeman, communications/website manager
 
 

On the Thursday before February break, Middle School students spent the morning engaged in a community service learning (CSL) project focused on the issue of hunger. This CSL project was organized entirely by members of the Middle School CSL Club, and Middle School students packed 132 boxes containing 28,000 meals of soy, rice, vegetables, and vitamins for children in other countries. 

“This event was many months in the making,” explained Middle School Division Head Liza Raynal. “Students came to me with a proposal to bring CSL to campus—rather than have it off campus—and they asked that the focus could be around the issue of hunger.” 

To pitch their idea, eighth-grade CSL student-leaders created a PowerPoint presentation making the case for why this community service learning day would be impactful. “They needed to demonstrate to me that Middle School students would be engaged in learning around the issue of hunger, and that it would not just be a manual project,” shared Liza. 

The student-leaders created a series of workshops and discussions in which students participated for half of the CSL day. While one half of the Middle School packed meals in the GCC, the other half participated in a rotation of four workshops, which included discussions about global hunger and malnourishment, hunger in the United States, and food deserts. During one workshop, Middle School students played a student-created version of The Game of Life, which demonstrated the impact of hunger on one’s growth, development, and success in life. 

Eighth-grader Ben J., speaking on behalf of the CSL Club, shared, “Our goals for the CSL day were to help decrease hunger and food insecurity within our communities, as well as communities near us, while educating and informing the student body about this important issue.”

Each box of the 132 total our Nuevans packed will feed one child for an entire year, which will have a huge impact on a child in an impoverished part of the world. Said eighth-grader Zachariah G., “This feels very real because we are packing full meals for kids.” 

“This is so great,” said eighth-grader Averi M. as she packed bags of food. “We are working together to support the community as a community.” 

“Seeing the joy our students had while packing these meals is what this day is all about,” Liza said. “Being able to make space for our students to lead and teach their peers is a wonderful byproduct. I’m really proud of the organizing committee and what they created for their peers.” 

“After talking to many of our peers and participants from this event,” Ben added, “we believe that our overall goals were achieved and we were able to bring together a community of caring, passionate people who made a difference.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



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